The three-piece set doesn’t come with a sun protection treatment, but Paula’s Choice has one in the line, the Clear Ultra-Light Daily Fluid SPF 30+. “Sun protection is really important, especially with acneic skin,” says Townsend. “In many cases, stronger acne products can make the skin photosensitive to the sun.” This isn’t your normal gloppy white sunscreen. Its fluid formula slips over tender skin, doesn’t need a ton of rubbing in, and also leaves a mattifying finish.
Lastly, one of the best preventative steps is to drink water everything all day. When you play properly hydrated, your body is able to process all the toxins that go in it a lot more efficiently. It is no surprise that one of the main ways your body gets rid of toxins is through the pores in your skin. If you don't regularly flush out your system, then you are paving the way to allowing a backup of gunk to clog your pores. Once your pores are clogged, you are one step closer to getting an acne breakout. Of course, you can help to avoid all this by staying properly hydrated.
We suggest avoiding spot treatments. “Benzoyl peroxide, when placed on red spots, can actually cause more irritation and inflammation to the area. It’s best used to prevent red bumps and pustules, and applied all over the area you want to treat,” said Townsend, who was also quick to naysay a spot-treat-only approach: “Acne affects all of the pores. If someone is going to spot treat against my advice, I still suggest they spot treat one day and treat the whole face the next.”
For mild to moderate acne, dermatologists often suggest an acne face wash with bacteria-killing benzoyl peroxide (to minimize irritation, 3.5 percent strength should be your max if you have sensitive skin), along with a prescription topical antimicrobial such as clindamycin or erythromycin. If you rather go with a gentle face wash for sensitive skin, you can use that and apply a benzoyl peroxide acne spot treatment instead.
How to Handle It: Think of these as bigger, pissed-off whiteheads. Your best bet, says Zeichner, is to stock up on benzoyl peroxide, which kills the bacteria. A spot treatment like Murad Acne Spot Fast Fix ($22) should do the trick. Also, try not to pop them — as tempting as that may be. Since they're inflamed, they're more likely to scar if you go the DIY route.
A 2013 study on acne vulgaris in The Nurse Practitioner concurred that a multidimensional approach to acne is usually necessary because most people have a combination of symptoms. Based on the advice of dermatologists and aestheticians, we turned our focus to regimen sets, analyzing the ingredients of more than 40 kits before finding our top picks.
Acne (acne vulgaris, common acne) is a disease of the hair follicles of the face, chest, and back that affects almost all teenagers during puberty -- the only exception being members of a few primitive Neolithic tribes living in isolation. It is not caused by bacteria, although bacteria play a role in its development. It is not unusual for some women to develop acne in their mid- to late-20s.
Stronger cases may call for prescription retinoids (such as Retin-A or Tazorac), which “are really the standard of care for most acne therapy,” says Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Certain drugs, such as Epiduo and Ziana, combine retinoids with antibacterials and may be more effective than separate products. Because retinoids also have anti-wrinkle properties (they help stimulate collagen production), they are especially beneficial for adult acne sufferers.
I have had cystic acne for about four years. I have been seeing a dermatologist for at least two of those years. It’s a long road, and one thing that I can absolutely guarantee does not help to treat acne in any way whatsoever is exercise. I know this because a) most dermatologists and doctors agree that if anything, exercise worsens acne; and b) I’ve been an athlete for most of my life – the harder I train, the worse my acne; and c) although I always wear clean lycra and shower straight after I finish my session, the acne on my back is in the shape of the cross-over straps of my sports bra.
Alternative and integrative medicine approaches used in the treatment of acne include fish oil, brewer's yeast, probiotics, oral zinc and topical tea tree oil. More research is needed to establish the potential effectiveness and long-term safety of these and other integrative approaches, such as biofeedback and traditional Chinese medicine. Talk with your doctor about the pros and cons of specific treatments before you try them.
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