I am 33 and having cystic inflammed acne on my face, back and chest. I had fibroids, one of the big one now removed but couple of them still existing. My acne is related to hormonal imbalanace as I have facial hair on my chin, which I have to thread every couple of days. My dermatologist said if I’m trying on having a baby, I should not be taking any medication, in the past that helped were birth control pills and spirnolactone ( this caused me bad pain in my kidney area, but helped clear out acne right away). Also, drinking baking soda wth fresh squeezed lemon juice helped clear out my skin, but can’t have it everyday since it can cause low BP and I felt light headed when I take it. My acne becomes active during the monthly cycle. I understand that ACV is acidic, my body is already acidic – would it help?
If you're willing to invest in some serious skincare to soothe your acne-prone skin woes, Lancer's blemish-control polish is a great addition to your skincare routine. This treatment can be used as an exfoliant in conjunction with the best spot treatment for your acne type to further treat severe acne and improve the overall appearance of blemishes.
How to Handle It: Pair two of the best-known acne-fighting ingredients, salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide, in the week leading up to your period. (If you're feeling bloated, now's the time to do it.) The combo can help prevent hormonal acne from happening in the first place. Zeichner suggests following a salicylic acid wash, like fan-favorite Neutrogena Oil-Free Acne Wash Pink Grapefruit Facial Cleanser ($7), with a benzoyl peroxide spot treatment, such as Murad Acne Spot Fast Fix ($22). If you're still seeing zits, "visit your dermatologist to discuss prescription options, like birth control pills, oral spironolactone — which blocks oil — or topical Aczone 7.5 percent gel," says Zeichner. "It's shown to be particularly effective in adult women without causing irritation." Oral contraceptives level out those hormone fluctuations, keeping your oil production normal and your skin clear.
Oral medications: Doctors may start antibiotic treatment with tetracycline (Sumycin) or one of the related "cyclines," such as doxycycline (Vibramycin, Oracea, Adoxa, Atridox, and others) and minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin). Other oral antibiotics that are useful for treating acne are cefadroxil (Duricef), amoxicillin (Amoxil, DisperMox, Trimox), and the sulfa drugs.
Benzoyl peroxide is an antibacterial ingredient, and it’s very effective at killing the P. acnes bacteria that causes breakouts. But benzoyl isn’t without its downsides. The leave-on creams and cleansing treatments can dry out sensitive skin and bleach clothing if you aren’t careful. Board-certified dermatologist Eric Meinhardt, M.D., previously told SELF that it's best to stick to formulations that have no more than 2 percent of benzoyl peroxide listed on the active ingredients chart; stronger concentrations are harder on your skin without being any tougher on bacteria.
There's more to treating acne than just washing your face twice a day and applying layers and layers of zit cream to any blemishes that pop up — and it starts when you're sleeping. "If you are acne-prone, it is important to change your pillowcase every day or every few days as opposed to every week," advises Debra Jaliman M.D., board-certified NYC dermatologist and author of Skin Rules: Trade Secrets From A Top New York Dermatologist. And when it comes to choosing pillowcases, stick with cotton. "Cotton pillowcases are better than other fabrics because they are natural fabrics and they breathe," Jaliman says.
Antibiotics. These work by killing excess skin bacteria and reducing redness. For the first few months of treatment, you may use both a retinoid and an antibiotic, with the antibiotic applied in the morning and the retinoid in the evening. The antibiotics are often combined with benzoyl peroxide to reduce the likelihood of developing antibiotic resistance. Examples include clindamycin with benzoyl peroxide (Benzaclin, Duac, Acanya) and erythromycin with benzoyl peroxide (Benzamycin). Topical antibiotics alone aren't recommended.
×