The skin care products you apply to your face regularly can have a big impact on your complexion. You shouldn’t skip moisturizing if you have acne, especially if you’re using drying treatments—but the type of moisturizer you use can make a difference. “Even acne-prone teenagers need to moisturize to keep their skin barrier healthy. The skin barrier can become damaged from drying acne products and medications,” Arielle Kauvar, MD, director of New York Laser & Skin Care and clinical professor of dermatology at New York University School of Medicine, recently told Prevention.
Applying lotion should never be an afterthought or something you only do when your face feels dry. According to dermatologist Fayne L. Frey, M.D., FAAD, "studies show that well-hydrated skin is less likely to break out." And if you have oily skin, don't let moisturizer scare you, says Dr. Frey, claiming "even individuals with 'oily skin' can benefit from daily moisturizing." Neelam A. Vashi, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology and director of research in cosmetic and laser medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine, suggests oily skin types try out "liquids, gels, and serums" instead of thicker, creamy lotions.
How to Handle It: Speaking of touching, don't! Picking it, squeezing it, or poking at it will only worsen the situation. These may disappear on their own after a few days. Otherwise, Zeichner suggests visiting your dermatologist for a shot of cortisone, which will reduce inflammation and shrink it in just 24 to 48 hours. But if a last-minute appointment isn't in the cards, play mad scientist. First, ice the area, and then apply salicylic acid gel, benzoyl peroxide gel, and 1 percent hydrocortisone cream. The combo will calm skin, kill bacteria, and draw out excess oil from the pimple — all things necessary to take this down, says Zeichner.

-Chemical exfoliants like BHAs (salicylic acid is one, which can be found in willow bark extractions for those who prefer natural) sink down INTO the skin and work to dissolve the gunk trapped in your pores. Word of warning, though, if you begin using BHAs: it’s common for it to cause a session of “purging” that lasts for up to two weeks at most, which means your skin can have more acne than usual. This SOUNDS terrible, but it’s actually a good thing– it means it’s working and causing all of the gross, deep-embedded pustules to come to the surface where they’ll be healed. Once the purging session is over, you should have drastically reduced amounts of acne as long as you keep up with your BHAs to ensure no more acne can form.


It's a common misconception that those with oily skin shouldn't moisturize. Be sure you're treating your entire face to a full routine and not solely relying on spot treatments to battle your breakouts. If your acne comes with a side of oil, this is your best bet for a daily moisturizer. It contains panadoxine, a vitamin B6 derivative that improves skin’s overall healthy balance by visually minimizing pore size and shine.
As bizarre as it may sound, honey can actually prove to be the perfect solution to curing acne overnight. Although it seems sticky (and like it can probably do more harm than good by clogging pores), honey actually has anti-bacterial properties that help it reduce the size of pimples. Dab a small amount of honey onto a pimple and leave it on the area for an hour; then rinse off since this shouldn’t be left on overnight.
You can use pure apple cider vinegar (with the mother culture) as your evening and morning toner. Apple cider vinegar is packed with potassium, magnesium, acetic acid and various enzymes that kill bacteria on the skin. Chronic acne can be the result of bacteria and fungi that continue to spread and grow on the surface of the skin. With a cotton ball, smooth ACV over skin paying particular attention to active breakouts and acne prone areas.
And if you thought blackheads and whiteheads were annoying, the deep painful pimples that often pop up in adult acne are much more aggravating—and harder to get rid of. So, we talked to dermatologists to find out which acne treatments are the most effective on all types of pimples. Keep reading to learn what causes acne in the first place, plus the best acne treatments worth spending your hard-earned dollars on.
What's Going On: Do you tend to get these at the same time every month — say, just before you get your period? Because these are the work of fluctuating hormones, says Joshua Zeichner, a dermatologist and the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Hormones can put oil production into overdrive, and having an excess of it means that it’s more likely to settle in your pores and cause zits.
Hi – I’m a 37 year old female wit hormonal cystic acne. I know I’m going to catch some heat for this BUT I have had cystic acne for the past 2-3 years. When I tell you that I tried EVERYTHING please believe me. I’ve spent so much money on acne products, I probably could’ve paid off my car! Two months ago, I decided to try an old remedy that I used when I was in middle school – rubbing alcohol. Yes, it can be damaging to the skin but understand that I exfoliate and moisturize daily. Sorry if this is TMI, but my monthly came on last night – the root cause of my acne along with my hair rubbing along my face when it is not in a pony tail. Two days ago, I felt two painful, itchy cysts developing. I attacked both of them with rubbing alcohol.
The other downside to Proactiv+ is that the bottles are small — like, half the size of Paula’s Choice small. Combine that with its recommended two or three-times daily application, and you’re going to be going through a lot of kits, which ultimately means spending more money on your treatment. If Proactiv is the only thing that works for you, it may very well be worth the investment, but we recommend starting with Paula’s Choice to see if you can get the same results at a cheaper price.
No one factor causes acne. Acne occurs when sebaceous (oil) glands attached to the hair follicles are stimulated at the time of puberty or due to other hormonal changes. Sebum (oil) is a natural substance that lubricates and protects the skin. Associated with increased oil production is a change in the manner in which the skin cells mature, predisposing them to plug the follicular pore. The plug can appear as a whitehead if it is covered by a thin layer of skin, or if exposed to the air, the darker exposed portion of the plug is called a "blackhead." The plugged hair follicle gradually enlarges, producing a bump. As the follicle enlarges, the wall may rupture, allowing irritating substances and normal skin bacteria access into the deeper layers of the skin, ultimately producing inflammation. Inflammation near the skin's surface produces a pustule; deeper inflammation results in a papule (pimple); if the inflammation is deeper still, it forms a cyst.
Both photodynamic therapy and laser therapy show potential for long-term reduction in acne, so an argument could be made that they could provide some long-term relief for some people, but not cure. And concerningly, like isotretinoin, these treatments achieve their results primarily through damaging skin oil glands. What damaging these glands will mean to the health and aging of the skin in the long-term remains to be seen, and is a risk.
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