Remember, fighting acne requires both external treatment and an internal treatment. Live probiotics support healthy digestion and immune system functioning, plus improves skin health by fighting acne. According to a recent study published in Dermatology Online Journal, researchers indicate that probiotic foods and supplements are promising and safe home remedies for acne. (15) The study indicates that larger trials are still needed, but evidence thus far is promising for using probiotics to improve gut health and fight acne.
The only medication that can make an argument that it cures acne is isotretinoin, because research shows it permanently reduces skin oil production and provides "remission" of acne in 66% of people. However, even in the case of isotretinoin, relapse rates may be higher than we think. Also, isotretinoin is recommended only for severe acne that does not respond to other treatments because it comes with a litany of side effects, and leaves the skin and the entire body permanently altered.
Salicylic acid also has anti-inflammatory properties to help with inflamed cystic breakouts that can occur when blockages deep in the hair follicles rupture beneath the skin. Although it's totally fine to use salicylic acid in a face wash, you may find that you have better results when using it as a toner, moisturizer, or leave-on spot treatment because these give it more time to do its work. And keep in mind, salicylic acid can dry out the skin if over-applied, so it may be wise to choose only one product with the ingredient to use every day.
Any acne treatment is a weeks-long experiment that you’re conducting with your skin. Acne is slow to heal, and in some cases, it can get worse before it gets better (nearly every benzoyl peroxide product we looked at emphasized the likeliness of irritating acne further, and starting off with a lighter application). April W. Armstrong, a doctor at the University of California Davis Health System, recommends waiting at least one month before you deem a product ineffective.

Another easy way to prevent acne-causing bacteria from invading your pores is to make sure your phone (yes, your phone!) is clean, says dermatologist Margaret Ravits, M.D. "Your device travels with you all day — from home to the car or subway, to work, to the gym, to the restaurant for a night out. Even to the bathroom!" explains Dr. Ravits. "It can get grimy and then you press it against your face for hours each week and transfer that grime, sweat, and bacteria onto your skin. An easy way to prevent breakouts? Wipe down your cell phone or mobile device regularly," Dr. Ravits suggests.
What is the best product for acne if you have dry skin? Coconut oil is one of the most versatile and healthy oils on earth. While it can be too heavy for some skin, coconut oil is generally an excellent moisturizer. A study published in Biomaterials found that lauric acid found in coconut oil demonstrates the strongest bacterial activity against acne caused by bacteria. (12) There is an increasing demand for coconut oil beauty products because the lauric acid, antioxidants and medium-chain fatty acids hydrate and restore skin and hair.
Good Skin Care Routine: Avoid scented and heavy moisturizers. Make sure to exfoliate your skin before applying the moisturizer. It is very important to remove make up before going to bed as reduces the risk of clogging the pores. For a healthy growth of new skin cells, you can use effective scrubs which are not abrasive. Some of the important things a scrub should contain are glycolyic acid and fruit enzymes. Sunscreens and vitamin C helps in lightening and preventing acne scars.
This is probably one of the best things that you can put on your face to reduce acne. The benefits of tea tree oil are well known, which is probably why it’s an ingredient in so many acne products on the market. It is a solvent that helps eliminate clogged pores! In a cup, mix one teaspoon of tea tree oil with nine teaspoons of water to thin it out. Dip a cotton swab into the solution and apply it to your pimples.
According to the American Academy of Dermatology, acne is the most common skin condition in the United States. (1) Occasional breakouts and chronic acne plague tens of millions of Americans of all ages every year. About 85 percent of teens experience some type of acne, but even many adults deal with at least occasional breakouts too. About half of teens and young adults suffering from acne will have severe enough symptoms to seek out professional help from a dermatologist.
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If you have acne that's not responding to self-care and over-the-counter treatments, make an appointment with your doctor. Early, effective treatment of acne reduces the risk of scarring and of lasting damage to your self-esteem. After an initial examination, your doctor may refer you to a specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions (dermatologist).
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