Probiotic-Rich Foods: One of the best ways to fight acne is to use probiotics to address the issues between gut and skin connection. Probiotic foods like kefir, cultured vegetables or yogurt will line up your gut with healthy, sealed barrier which prevent the inflammation that can trigger the acne. As per a Korean study conducted on 56 acne patients, drinking lactobacillus-fermented dairy drink can reduces lesion count and sebum production in 12 weeks.
Oral contraceptives can help normalize hormonal surges and regulate monthly cycles so that oil glands don’t go into overdrive, says Dr. Zeichner. Doctors may prescribe one of four brands of birth control pills—Yaz, Beyaz, Estrostep, and Ortho Tri-Cyclen—that are FDA approved for treating acne. As always, patients taking oral contraceptives should be aware of potential birth control side effects, including blood clots or vaginal dryness.
Apple cider vinegar is a very good solution for the treatment of acne. It helps in balancing the pH of the skin. Apple cider vinegar is rich in malic and lactic acids. It acts as an exfoliator and softener for the skin. Add vinegar in water in the ratio of 1:3. With the help of a cotton ball, apply the solution on the infected area. Leave it for ten minutes. Rinse the face thoroughly. For best results, practice the method for several times a day.
There's more to treating acne than just washing your face twice a day and applying layers and layers of zit cream to any blemishes that pop up — and it starts when you're sleeping. "If you are acne-prone, it is important to change your pillowcase every day or every few days as opposed to every week," advises Debra Jaliman M.D., board-certified NYC dermatologist and author of Skin Rules: Trade Secrets From A Top New York Dermatologist. And when it comes to choosing pillowcases, stick with cotton. "Cotton pillowcases are better than other fabrics because they are natural fabrics and they breathe," Jaliman says.
Applying lotion should never be an afterthought or something you only do when your face feels dry. According to dermatologist Fayne L. Frey, M.D., FAAD, "studies show that well-hydrated skin is less likely to break out." And if you have oily skin, don't let moisturizer scare you, says Dr. Frey, claiming "even individuals with 'oily skin' can benefit from daily moisturizing." Neelam A. Vashi, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology and director of research in cosmetic and laser medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine, suggests oily skin types try out "liquids, gels, and serums" instead of thicker, creamy lotions.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
But the side effects of targeted breakout cream treatments aren’t always worth it. “So many products instruct consumers to use benzoyl peroxide spot treat red bumps and pustules. I don’t recommend it,” says Dr. Lawrence Green, board-certified dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at George Washington University. Such high concentrations of benzoyl peroxide cause added irritation and inflammation to already sensitive skin, so with this in mind, we cut kits that included spot treatments.
It's a common misconception that those with oily skin shouldn't moisturize. Be sure you're treating your entire face to a full routine and not solely relying on spot treatments to battle your breakouts. If your acne comes with a side of oil, this is your best bet for a daily moisturizer. It contains panadoxine, a vitamin B6 derivative that improves skin’s overall healthy balance by visually minimizing pore size and shine.
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Keep in mind that even if some products market themselves toward severe acne breakouts, all the kits we looked at are definitely designed for mild to moderate acne. Not sure if you fit on that scale? You’re not alone! When you’re in the middle of a breakout, all acne seems severe, so it can be difficult to self-diagnose your symptoms. We talked to dermatologists and cosmetic chemists to better understand the differences between the various types of acne (see below).
Have you tried treating your acne with no luck? You might simply be using the wrong product for the type you have. Whether you have periodic breakouts or more stubborn cystic acne, there's a solution. We asked Dr. Neal Schultz, an NYC dermatologist, to share the best treatments for every type of acne. Read on for his expert product recommendations, along with some editor favorites, that'll give you clear skin in no time.
Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a procedure that treats precancerous cells, in addition to other types of cancer cells. The medical treatment does this with the help of a photosensitizing drug and a light source that activates the applied drug, destroying cancer cells. PDT is approved to treat non-small cell lung cancer, esophageal cancer, and Barrett's esophagus. It treats actinic keratosis, as well as acne, rosacea, skin cancer, sun damage, oily skin, wrinkles, warts, psoriasis, and enlarged sebaceous glands.
Applying lotion should never be an afterthought or something you only do when your face feels dry. According to dermatologist Fayne L. Frey, M.D., FAAD, "studies show that well-hydrated skin is less likely to break out." And if you have oily skin, don't let moisturizer scare you, says Dr. Frey, claiming "even individuals with 'oily skin' can benefit from daily moisturizing." Neelam A. Vashi, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology and director of research in cosmetic and laser medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine, suggests oily skin types try out "liquids, gels, and serums" instead of thicker, creamy lotions.
Isotretinoin: Accutane was the original brand name; there are now several generic versions in common use, including Sotret, Claravis, and Amnesteem. Isotretinoin is an excellent treatment for severe, scarring, persistent acne and has been used on millions of patients since it was introduced in Europe in 1971 and in the U.S. in 1982. It should be used for people with severe acne, chiefly of the cystic variety, that has been unresponsive to conventional therapies like those listed above. If taken in sufficient dosage, it should eliminate the need to continue the use of prescription drugs in most patients. The drug has many potential serious side effects and requires a number of unique controls before it is prescribed. This means that isotretinoin is not a good choice for people whose acne is not that severe but who are frustrated and want "something that will knock acne out once and for all." In order to use the drug, the prescribing physician, the patient, and the supplying pharmacy must be enrolled in the online "iPLEDGE PROGRAM." Used properly, isotretinoin is safe and produces few side effects beyond dry lips and occasional muscle aches. This drug is prescribed for five to six months at a dosage that has a high likelihood of preventing the return of acne. Fasting blood tests are monitored monthly to check liver function and the level of triglycerides, substances related to cholesterol, which often rise a bit during treatment but rarely to the point at which treatment has to be modified or stopped.
'There is a high risk of birth defects, so women must take careful steps to prevent pregnancy during treatment,' she explains. 'Dry, cracked lips are common, blood tests must be done to monitor cholesterol and liver function, alcohol intake should be restricted and prolonged sun exposure must be avoided as there is a higher risk of getting a sunburn. Close supervision by a dermatologist experienced in prescribing the drug is mandatory.'
If you notice that you’re breaking out right around your period every month, your acne might be linked to hormones. “A sensitivity to the hormones called androgens manifests in the form of cystic acne,” Dr. Linkner says. Androgens, namely testosterone, cause the skin to produce more sebum. More sebum equals more acne. Birth control, which has estrogen and progestin, helps keep hormones balanced and skin clear. Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Estrostep, and YAZ are all FDA-approved as acne treatments.

What is the best product for acne if you have dry skin? Coconut oil is one of the most versatile and healthy oils on earth. While it can be too heavy for some skin, coconut oil is generally an excellent moisturizer. A study published in Biomaterials found that lauric acid found in coconut oil demonstrates the strongest bacterial activity against acne caused by bacteria. (12) There is an increasing demand for coconut oil beauty products because the lauric acid, antioxidants and medium-chain fatty acids hydrate and restore skin and hair.
Oral acne treatment: These medications, which work internally, are prescribed when you have red, swollen pimples (acne cysts and nodules). They can come in different forms such as antibiotics (which kill bacteria and decrease inflammation), birth control pills (which helps with hormonal acne), and isotretinoin (commonly referred to as Accutane, even though that specific brand was discontinued).
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