Isotretinoin: Accutane was the original brand name; there are now several generic versions in common use, including Sotret, Claravis, and Amnesteem. Isotretinoin is an excellent treatment for severe, scarring, persistent acne and has been used on millions of patients since it was introduced in Europe in 1971 and in the U.S. in 1982. It should be used for people with severe acne, chiefly of the cystic variety, that has been unresponsive to conventional therapies like those listed above. If taken in sufficient dosage, it should eliminate the need to continue the use of prescription drugs in most patients. The drug has many potential serious side effects and requires a number of unique controls before it is prescribed. This means that isotretinoin is not a good choice for people whose acne is not that severe but who are frustrated and want "something that will knock acne out once and for all." In order to use the drug, the prescribing physician, the patient, and the supplying pharmacy must be enrolled in the online "iPLEDGE PROGRAM." Used properly, isotretinoin is safe and produces few side effects beyond dry lips and occasional muscle aches. This drug is prescribed for five to six months at a dosage that has a high likelihood of preventing the return of acne. Fasting blood tests are monitored monthly to check liver function and the level of triglycerides, substances related to cholesterol, which often rise a bit during treatment but rarely to the point at which treatment has to be modified or stopped.


Sometimes birth control alone isn’t enough to really make a difference in hormonal acne. That’s when your doctor might recommend adding in an androgen blocker such as spironalactone. Spiro (as it’s often called) minimizes the amount of androgen hormones in circulation by blocking the receptors that bind with testosterone. When these pills are taken at the same time as an oral contraceptive, many women see an improvement in breakouts, according to Dr. Linkner. The drug is sometimes prescribed to women with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) to relieve androgen-related symptoms like excessive hair growth, hypertension, oily skin, and acne.
It's best to consult a primary care physician or dermatologist if an individual is unable to adequately control his or her acne. The goal of treatment should be the prevention of scarring (not a flawless complexion) so that after the condition spontaneously resolves there is no lasting sign of the affliction. Here are some of the options available:
Pimple, zit, blemish, whitehead, blackhead — whatever you call your acne, there's one thing we can all agree on — it's the absolute worst! It seems like there's an infinite supply of products (and a few well-known home treatment myths… toothpaste on your pimples anyone?) that promise acne treatment and prevention. Whether you get the occasional stress-induced pimple or struggle with chronic acne, finding the best way to keep those annoying blemishes off your face isn't always easy. To make things a little simpler, we've compiled some common acne mistakes and exactly what you can do to fix them.
My son has been battling cyst acne for over a year now. Proactive somewhat control it but wasn’t doing anything after a while so his acne came back with a vengeance. His was having it bad. So I turn into natural remedies instead and finally I’m seeing good results. I’m using the steam method to open his pores once a week. I then make a paste of baking soda and water and apply that. I do it after the steam method and repeat it every two days. But I help him wash his face with cuava soap tree times a day. I love that soap. It dries your skin as soon as you apply it. I help him since he also has cyst acne in his back as well. It was so awful it showed black scars all over. Finally it’s clearing up so well I’m happy with the natural remedies. I still made an appointment with his dermatologist for next to help him fight it from within with antibiotics just in case. He tells me now that isn’t necessary since it’s going away. I told him that’s not an option.
Warning: Sulfur smells like rotten eggs. But it is an effective ingredient at drying up pus-filled pimples and whiteheads (you’ve gotta take the good with the bad). It works by sucking up the oil. Sulfur is typically mixed with other active ingredients to get the most efficacy and fragrances to mask the strong scent. You can often find it in masks and spot treatments.

There are two big guns used to take down acne, and they're both great at doing entirely different things. Salicylic acid is a beta hydroxy acid that comes from willow bark and works primarily as an exfoliator, breaking down fatty acids like sebum so your pores don’t clog. (Glycolic acid works similarly but is less effective.) These acids are effective on comedones — whiteheads, blackheads, and other non-red bumps.


A review published in the Archives of Dermatological Research found evidence that sleep deprivation, stress and other aspects of “modern life” are linked to adult female acne. The researchers point out that “Modern life presents many stresses including urban noises, socioeconomic pressures and light stimuli. Women are especially affected by stress during daily routine. Women also have a higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. Sleep restriction is added to these factors, with several negative consequences on health, including on hormonal secretion and the immune system.” (7)
Rosacea is a skin disease that causes redness of the forehead, chin, and lower half of the nose. In addition to inflammation of the facial skin, symptoms include dilation of the blood vessels and pimples (acne rosacea) in the middle third of the face. Oral and topical antibiotics are treatments for rosacea. If left untreated, rhinophyma (a disfiguring nose condition) may result.
What is cystic acne? It is a very painful pimple with pus and swelling in it. Regardless of age, it can affect anyone but it is very common in teenagers. Hormonal change during puberty is the root cause of this kind of acne. During puberty, androgen hormones increase rapidly which encourage excess oil production. Excess oil attracts dirt that locks up into the pores. When it clogs the pores and go deep into the skin, the bacteria thrive in it developing cystic pimple. So, the attack of bacteria is what causes cystic acne.

It's a common misconception that those with oily skin shouldn't moisturize. Be sure you're treating your entire face to a full routine and not solely relying on spot treatments to battle your breakouts. If your acne comes with a side of oil, this is your best bet for a daily moisturizer. It contains panadoxine, a vitamin B6 derivative that improves skin’s overall healthy balance by visually minimizing pore size and shine.
The Anti-Redness Exfoliating Solution is mostly water, but its 2 percent salicylic acid is enough to eat through oil and remove the dead skin cells clogging your pores — and it boasts a higher concentration than nearly every other kit we looked at. Sodium hyaluronate, the super-moisturizing humectant we fell in love with in our review on the Best Face Moisturizer, also caught our eye sitting smack dab in the middle of the ingredients list.

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Commercial sunscreens are packed with harmful chemicals that can irritate sensitive skin and acne-prone skin. Research shows that coconut oil has an SPF value of 8, as does olive oil. (14) To use as sun protection, apply a moderate amount to exposed skin every couple of hours and try to avoid spending too much time in direct sunlight during “peak” hours, which is about from 10am-3pm each day.
Anyone who's ever had a pimple (so basically, everyone) knows what a struggle it is to get rid of them. Your best bet is to stop acne before it even starts by eating right and making sure you keep your face clean. If you do happen to have a breakout, don't stress! Visit your dermatologist and let them help you figure out a skincare routine that's perfect for you. And most importantly, be patient! "Don't panic if the cream that your dermatologist gave you doesn't dissolve the zit in one or two days," says dermatologist Margaret Ravits, M.D. Your face will clear up in time… and don't forget the moisturizer!
And if you thought blackheads and whiteheads were annoying, the deep painful pimples that often pop up in adult acne are much more aggravating—and harder to get rid of. So, we talked to dermatologists to find out which acne treatments are the most effective on all types of pimples. Keep reading to learn what causes acne in the first place, plus the best acne treatments worth spending your hard-earned dollars on.
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