All acne is not, actually, created equal. This makes perfect sense, seeing as there are so many factors — i.e. hygiene, hormones, and genetics — that can both lead to and exacerbate your breakouts. But knowledge is power, and just knowing that there are different types, and that each kind requires its own plan of attack, puts you ahead of the clear-skin curve. Once you figure out what you're working with, it gets far easier to treat. Here, your ultimate guide to identifying, and then taking down, every type of acne out there, according to dermatologists. Find out how to identify and deal with the different kinds of acne, including blackheads, whiteheads, blind pimples, and cystic zits.
Everyone's skin is different, so the routine and facial cleanser that works for your best friend probably won't work for you. "It is always best to see a dermatologist to determine a best skin routine as often times prescription products are needed as well," says board certified dermatologist and medical director and founder of California Dermatology Specialists, Dr. Eric Meinhardt.
Cinnamon and Honey Mask: Mix two tablespoons of raw honey, one teaspoon of coconut oil and 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon. Smooth over face. Keep away from eyes, as the cinnamon can be an irritant. Relax for 5–10 minutes and gently remove with damp cloth. Honey and cinnamon used together helps to fight acne because of its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antibacterial properties.

For mild to moderate acne, dermatologists often suggest an acne face wash with bacteria-killing benzoyl peroxide (to minimize irritation, 3.5 percent strength should be your max if you have sensitive skin), along with a prescription topical antimicrobial such as clindamycin or erythromycin. If you rather go with a gentle face wash for sensitive skin, you can use that and apply a benzoyl peroxide acne spot treatment instead.


Moderation and regularity are good things, but not everyone can sleep eight hours, eat three healthy meals per day, and drink plenty of water a day. Probably the most useful lifestyle changes one can make is to never to pick or squeeze pimples. Playing with or popping pimples, no matter how careful and clean one is, nearly always makes bumps stay redder and bumpier longer. People often refer to redness as "scarring," but fortunately, it usually isn't permanent. It's just a mark that takes months to fade if left entirely alone.


There are different types of natural clay. You have to choose one as per your skin type. The different colors of clay indicate different minerals present in it which affect your skin in different ways. .. Brown clay contains amazing exfoliating properties but it is not good for dry skin. White and green clay are good for all skin types as they are gentle.
Like hair products, makeup and skin care products contain ingredients that can cause acne. Common offenders include lanolin, mineral oil, aluminum, retinyl acetate, alcohol, oxybenzone, triclosan, parabens, polyethylene, BHA and BHT, and formaldehyde-based preservatives. Read ingredient labels to avoid putting these types of chemicals on your sensitive skin.

Egg whites are a natural remedy for reducing excess oil from skin and draw out impurities from the pores. Wash your face with lukewarm water. Crack one egg and separate yolk from its white part. Take out the white part in a bowl and mix it firmly until the bubbles are formed. Apply it on the face and cover it with tissue papers. Let it dry for 20 minutes. Then, remove all the tissue papers. Wash your face with water.


There are two big guns used to take down acne, and they're both great at doing entirely different things. Salicylic acid is a beta hydroxy acid that comes from willow bark and works primarily as an exfoliator, breaking down fatty acids like sebum so your pores don’t clog. (Glycolic acid works similarly but is less effective.) These acids are effective on comedones — whiteheads, blackheads, and other non-red bumps.
Oral acne treatment: These medications, which work internally, are prescribed when you have red, swollen pimples (acne cysts and nodules). They can come in different forms such as antibiotics (which kill bacteria and decrease inflammation), birth control pills (which helps with hormonal acne), and isotretinoin (commonly referred to as Accutane, even though that specific brand was discontinued).

Isotretinoin: Accutane was the original brand name; there are now several generic versions in common use, including Sotret, Claravis, and Amnesteem. Isotretinoin is an excellent treatment for severe, scarring, persistent acne and has been used on millions of patients since it was introduced in Europe in 1971 and in the U.S. in 1982. It should be used for people with severe acne, chiefly of the cystic variety, that has been unresponsive to conventional therapies like those listed above. If taken in sufficient dosage, it should eliminate the need to continue the use of prescription drugs in most patients. The drug has many potential serious side effects and requires a number of unique controls before it is prescribed. This means that isotretinoin is not a good choice for people whose acne is not that severe but who are frustrated and want "something that will knock acne out once and for all." In order to use the drug, the prescribing physician, the patient, and the supplying pharmacy must be enrolled in the online "iPLEDGE PROGRAM." Used properly, isotretinoin is safe and produces few side effects beyond dry lips and occasional muscle aches. This drug is prescribed for five to six months at a dosage that has a high likelihood of preventing the return of acne. Fasting blood tests are monitored monthly to check liver function and the level of triglycerides, substances related to cholesterol, which often rise a bit during treatment but rarely to the point at which treatment has to be modified or stopped.
The pack of sandalwood and rosewater is considered to be very soothing for face. The anti-microbial properties of sandalwood help in cleaning the face and maintain its flawless glow. Put 2 tablespoon of sandalwood powder in a mixing bowl. Add pure rosewater to make a pack. Mix it carefully to avoid lumps. Now, wash your face with clean water and apply the pack, gently. Let it dry for 20 minutes. Clean your face with cold water and pat with a towel. You can also pour a few drops of glycerine to boost the curing process.
According to medical research, tea tree oil gels containing 5 percent tea tree oil may be as effective as medications containing 5 percent benzoyl peroxide. (10) Researchers do indicate that tea tree oil may work more slowly for some individuals, so try to be patient. To make a simple home remedy for acne using tea tree oil mix 4–8 drops of tea tree oil and one teaspoon of coconut oil or jojoba oil. Dap lightly onto the problem areas. Slight tingling is normal, but if the application causes lots of burning then discontinue use. Always use a carrier oil, as tea tree oil can be too harsh when applied directly to skin.
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Apart from being rich in protein, egg white also contains albumin and lysozyme. Albumin contains antiviral effect while the lysozyme destroys the cell walls of bacteria. Due to its skin tightening properties, it tightens the pores and cleans the skin deeply. This process works well for people with oily skin as egg white contains drying effect which removes excess oil from the skin.
Sorry and forgot to include that I drink 4 tablespoons of ACV in a 16 oz bottle of water daily. I started with ACV because of the countless benefits I read, acne treatment included. Now I’m hooked and will continue drinking daily since there are so many benefits. One thing I totally noticed is that I fall asleep now without taking a sleeping pill. A win for me! ACV may very well be helping with my cystic acne as well. I’ve been drinking it daily for about 3 months now.
Hi – I’m a 37 year old female wit hormonal cystic acne. I know I’m going to catch some heat for this BUT I have had cystic acne for the past 2-3 years. When I tell you that I tried EVERYTHING please believe me. I’ve spent so much money on acne products, I probably could’ve paid off my car! Two months ago, I decided to try an old remedy that I used when I was in middle school – rubbing alcohol. Yes, it can be damaging to the skin but understand that I exfoliate and moisturize daily. Sorry if this is TMI, but my monthly came on last night – the root cause of my acne along with my hair rubbing along my face when it is not in a pony tail. Two days ago, I felt two painful, itchy cysts developing. I attacked both of them with rubbing alcohol.
In one 2018 meta-analysis published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereolog, researchers found that milk consumption—particularly skim milk, which is higher in sugar than whole milk—was associated with a greater risk of acne. Beyond the higher sugar content, scientists believe that proteins and hormones found in milk products, including IGF-1, may play a role in acne flare-ups by increasing oil production and inflammation.
According to the American Academy of Dermatology, acne is the most common skin condition in the United States. (1) Occasional breakouts and chronic acne plague tens of millions of Americans of all ages every year. About 85 percent of teens experience some type of acne, but even many adults deal with at least occasional breakouts too. About half of teens and young adults suffering from acne will have severe enough symptoms to seek out professional help from a dermatologist.
The three-piece set doesn’t come with a sun protection treatment, but Paula’s Choice has one in the line, the Clear Ultra-Light Daily Fluid SPF 30+. “Sun protection is really important, especially with acneic skin,” says Townsend. “In many cases, stronger acne products can make the skin photosensitive to the sun.” This isn’t your normal gloppy white sunscreen. Its fluid formula slips over tender skin, doesn’t need a ton of rubbing in, and also leaves a mattifying finish.
As bizarre as it may sound, honey can actually prove to be the perfect solution to curing acne overnight. Although it seems sticky (and like it can probably do more harm than good by clogging pores), honey actually has anti-bacterial properties that help it reduce the size of pimples. Dab a small amount of honey onto a pimple and leave it on the area for an hour; then rinse off since this shouldn’t be left on overnight.

No one factor causes acne. Acne occurs when sebaceous (oil) glands attached to the hair follicles are stimulated at the time of puberty or due to other hormonal changes. Sebum (oil) is a natural substance that lubricates and protects the skin. Associated with increased oil production is a change in the manner in which the skin cells mature, predisposing them to plug the follicular pore. The plug can appear as a whitehead if it is covered by a thin layer of skin, or if exposed to the air, the darker exposed portion of the plug is called a "blackhead." The plugged hair follicle gradually enlarges, producing a bump. As the follicle enlarges, the wall may rupture, allowing irritating substances and normal skin bacteria access into the deeper layers of the skin, ultimately producing inflammation. Inflammation near the skin's surface produces a pustule; deeper inflammation results in a papule (pimple); if the inflammation is deeper still, it forms a cyst.
Sugar is a natural exfoliator, which easily opens up the clogged pores. Take 1½ cup of white sugar and 1½ cup of brown sugar. Add 2-3 tablespoons of coarse sea salt. Also add a half cup of olive oil. Add one whole vanilla bean and ten tablespoons of vanilla extract. Mix all the ingredients well and store it in a jar. Now, use one spoon daily as a scrub.

Sometimes birth control alone isn’t enough to really make a difference in hormonal acne. That’s when your doctor might recommend adding in an androgen blocker such as spironalactone. Spiro (as it’s often called) minimizes the amount of androgen hormones in circulation by blocking the receptors that bind with testosterone. When these pills are taken at the same time as an oral contraceptive, many women see an improvement in breakouts, according to Dr. Linkner. The drug is sometimes prescribed to women with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) to relieve androgen-related symptoms like excessive hair growth, hypertension, oily skin, and acne.
According to medical research, tea tree oil gels containing 5 percent tea tree oil may be as effective as medications containing 5 percent benzoyl peroxide. (10) Researchers do indicate that tea tree oil may work more slowly for some individuals, so try to be patient. To make a simple home remedy for acne using tea tree oil mix 4–8 drops of tea tree oil and one teaspoon of coconut oil or jojoba oil. Dap lightly onto the problem areas. Slight tingling is normal, but if the application causes lots of burning then discontinue use. Always use a carrier oil, as tea tree oil can be too harsh when applied directly to skin.
While you can certainly benefit from a great skin-care regimen, "in cystic acne, usually you need internal treatment," he says. "Topical medications usually don't work. Accutane is a great miracle cure for really bad cystic acne, but most people with cystic acne will improve with oral antibiotics — sometimes for two weeks, sometimes for three weeks."
What's Going On: Do you tend to get these at the same time every month — say, just before you get your period? Because these are the work of fluctuating hormones, says Joshua Zeichner, a dermatologist and the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Hormones can put oil production into overdrive, and having an excess of it means that it’s more likely to settle in your pores and cause zits.
Pimple, zit, blemish, whitehead, blackhead — whatever you call your acne, there's one thing we can all agree on — it's the absolute worst! It seems like there's an infinite supply of products (and a few well-known home treatment myths… toothpaste on your pimples anyone?) that promise acne treatment and prevention. Whether you get the occasional stress-induced pimple or struggle with chronic acne, finding the best way to keep those annoying blemishes off your face isn't always easy. To make things a little simpler, we've compiled some common acne mistakes and exactly what you can do to fix them.
Anyone who's ever had a pimple (so basically, everyone) knows what a struggle it is to get rid of them. Your best bet is to stop acne before it even starts by eating right and making sure you keep your face clean. If you do happen to have a breakout, don't stress! Visit your dermatologist and let them help you figure out a skincare routine that's perfect for you. And most importantly, be patient! "Don't panic if the cream that your dermatologist gave you doesn't dissolve the zit in one or two days," says dermatologist Margaret Ravits, M.D. Your face will clear up in time… and don't forget the moisturizer!
What is cystic acne? It is a very painful pimple with pus and swelling in it. Regardless of age, it can affect anyone but it is very common in teenagers. Hormonal change during puberty is the root cause of this kind of acne. During puberty, androgen hormones increase rapidly which encourage excess oil production. Excess oil attracts dirt that locks up into the pores. When it clogs the pores and go deep into the skin, the bacteria thrive in it developing cystic pimple. So, the attack of bacteria is what causes cystic acne.
Dermatologists aren’t sure why azelaic acid is so effective at clearing up inflammation, but it’s often used as an option for sensitive skin or pregnant patients. The ingredient is good at treating malasma, acne, and rosacea, Dr. Linkner says. Your dermatologist can prescribe products with high concentrations of azelaic acid, and you can also find over-the-counter options with lower concentrations of this active ingredient.
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