Most studies of acne drugs have involved people 12 years of age or older. Increasingly, younger children are getting acne as well. In one study of 365 girls ages 9 to 10, 78 percent of them had acne lesions. If your child has acne, consider consulting a pediatric dermatologist. Ask about drugs to avoid in children, appropriate doses, drug interactions, side effects, and how treatment may affect a child's growth and development.
As per your description, it will cystic acne which might be caused due to hormonal changes that usually happen during adolescent years. We recommend trying any above mentioned method to reduce the inflammation, redness and other discomforts caused by cystic acne. Apart from that, we have also mentioned dietary changes he should consider for effective and faster results.
Exfoliating cleansers and masks: A variety of mild scrubs, exfoliants, and masks can be used. These products may contain salicylic acid in a concentration that makes it a very mild peeling agent. These products remove the outer layer of the skin and thus open pores. Products containing glycolic or alpha hydroxy acids are also gentle skin exfoliants.

Other concerns include inflammatory bowel disease and the risk of depression and suicide in patients taking isotretinoin. Recent evidence seems to indicate that these problems are exceedingly rare. Government oversight has resulted in a highly publicized and very burdensome national registration system for those taking the drug. This has reinforced concerns in many patients and their families have that isotretinoin is dangerous. In fact, large-scale studies so far have shown no convincing evidence of increased risk for those taking isotretinoin compared with the general population. It is important for those taking this drug to report changes in mood or bowel habits (or any other symptoms) to their doctors. Even patients who are being treated for depression are not barred from taking isotretinoin, whose striking success often improves the mood and outlook of patients with severe disease.


Fayne L. Frey, M.D., a New York dermatologist who's been in practice for over 20 years, says "although there is no consensus on how often a person with healthy skin should wash their face, research clearly shows that folks with acne benefit from twice daily face cleansing." And if you regularly wear makeup, Lindsey Blondin, lead esthetician of George the Salon in Chicago, recommends doing two cleanses consecutively. The first cleanse "is to break up makeup, dirt, and oil on your face," while the second run through will "cleanse the skin itself."

Some people use natural treatments like tea tree oil (works like benzoyl peroxide, but slower) or alpha hydroxy acids (remove dead skin and unclog pores) for their acne care. Not much is known about how well many of these treatments work and their long-term safety. Many natural ingredients are added to acne lotions and creams. Talk to your doctor to see if they’re right for you.
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