Tim Siadatan is the chef behind two of London's most popular Italian restaurants, Trullo and Padella. His first cookbook presents a British take on Italian cooking, marrying the best of the Italian cuisine together with British produce. Trullo is about enjoying every element of Italian cookery, whether than be putting on an impressive dinner party spread or simply mastering the perfect, silky pasta sauce.
Marcella Hazan wrote this book based on her master classes and gives a wealth of tips and information on Italian cooking techniques and philosophies. There are 120 recipes that allow the reader ample opprtunity for practice. Hazan’s style is eloquent, if at times blunt, and makes the book a pleasure to read. This is the book for anyone who wants to learn why a recipe works, instead of just following simple directions on a page.
Tim Siadatan is the chef behind two of London's most popular Italian restaurants, Trullo and Padella. His first cookbook presents a British take on Italian cooking, marrying the best of the Italian cuisine together with British produce. Trullo is about enjoying every element of Italian cookery, whether than be putting on an impressive dinner party spread or simply mastering the perfect, silky pasta sauce.
COMMENTSGeorge Miller had rightly said, "The trouble with eating Italian food is that two or three days later you're hungry again". A four-course meal is served with a variety of 400 types of cheese, and every bite speaks of its origins from the 4th century BC. Did you know that Italians are known to take their food very seriously? The lunch hour is the most important meal of the day. It starts with antipasti (before the meal) like cheese, olives, salad etc. The main course mostly comprises of the most popular Italian recipe pasta or risotto. Fact: There are more than 600 shapes of pasta produced across the world.
Marking The River Cafe's momentus 30th birthday, River Cafe 30 features 120 recipes from across three decades of bold and accomplished Italian cooking at the iconic London institution. From modern updates to some of the best loved recipes from the first River Cafe cookbook to 30 new recipes and plenty of stories and tips from Ruth Rogers throughout.
Il timballo del gattopardo – Sicilian pie; pastry dough baked with a filling of penne rigata, Parmesan, and bound a sauce of ham, chicken, liver, onion, carrot, truffles, diced hard-boiled egg and seasoned with clove, cinnamon, salt and pepper. Gattopardo (the Serval) makes reference to the arms of the Lampedusa family and Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s well-known novel Il Gattopardo, not the contents of the dish.
There are three prominent Italian cookbook authors in the United State today. Marcella Hazan, Giuliano Bugialli and Mario Batali have written books for people with limited familiarity with traditional Italian cooking. A few of these volumes are listed below. Picking up any of these books will give the reader a head start in creating sumptuous Italian food. Most of these cookbooks include basic recipes and methods. These simple techniques can teach even the most inexperienced cook valuable skills. With the aid of these invaluable cookbooks and some practice, basic ingredients can be turned into sublime dishes. Pick one up and try it today.
“How we cling to our myths, we English”. The year is 1963, and in the intro to the first Penguin edition of this venerable tome, David is describing the disdain with which her countrymen viewed the culinary cultures of both France and Italy when she set about writing it, in 1954. Research for the book elicited in her a potent sense of discovery, and incredulity: “How wrong they had been, from Mrs Beeton down to my own contemporaries. Where had they been looking? Had they been looking at all?” Given the entrenched supremacy of Italian cookery on our contemporary menus – and the ubiquity of this book on our kitchen shelves – it borders on surreal to think there was a time, pre-David, when we might have been so collectively deluded. The four books that follow here can each be described as definitive, and best-selling, but one suspects they’d be neither, in this country, were it not for Elizabeth David and her ability to find gold, and, with such compulsion, to share it.
The Chiappa sisters grew up in Wales in the heart of a close-knit Italian community where food was always at the centre of family and social gatherings. Whether searching for porcini in the hills near their parents' home, making pasta with the whole family, or sharing food at the annual Welsh-Italian summer picnic, they have been immersed in the Italian way of cooking all their lives. Here they share their cherished family recipes, including all the pasta dishes featured in their Channel 4 series.
Il timballo del gattopardo – Sicilian pie; pastry dough baked with a filling of penne rigata, Parmesan, and bound a sauce of ham, chicken, liver, onion, carrot, truffles, diced hard-boiled egg and seasoned with clove, cinnamon, salt and pepper. Gattopardo (the Serval) makes reference to the arms of the Lampedusa family and Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s well-known novel Il Gattopardo, not the contents of the dish.
Choosing favorites from your cookbook collection is a bit like choosing a favorite child, but here at Serious Eats, we will take just about any opportunity to talk about awesome sources for recipes. Here are 10 of our favorite Italian cookbooks—books that introduced us to some of our favorite dishes to cook at home. (Warning: acquiring these books is likely to increase your pasta cravings.)
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