Dining is of course analogous to social time in Italy. It is a time when friends and family get together to tell stories and joke and enjoy one another’s company as well as enjoy great food. Whether you are interested in finding the best places to dine when in Italy, want to learn more about the history of Italian food, or hope to add some new Italian recipes to your repertoire, you are looking in the right place, right here at Made-In-Italy.com

"The books that guide you in your very first steps of learning to cook, that help you overcome fears and fall in love with the process, always earn a special place on the shelf. So it is with Cucina Rustica, the book that taught me that a recipe called Spaghetti with Oil and Garlic (the very first Dinner Tonight column I wrote) could be the most delicious thing in the world, and that most recipes would probably improve if you took out a few ingredients. This is a general lesson of Italian cooking that has informed the way I choose recipes. Yet while Cucina Rustica's recipes suggest simplicity, they are pitched perfectly between approachable and challenging. So I've never been bored cooking from it.
In Venice, the restaurateur behind Polpo, Russell Norman, explores the simplicity and wonder of Venetian home cooking across the seasons, from Grilled Spring Vegetable Pizza to a wintry Slow Roasted Veal Shin. Interspersed between 130 inspiring and accessible recipes for everything from pizza, pasta, risotto, meat dishes and plenty of seafood, as well desserts and authentic cocktails, you'll find notes on Russell's favourite markets, suppliers and places to visit, complete with stunning photography of this beautiful city. This book will give you serious wanderlust.

"The books that guide you in your very first steps of learning to cook, that help you overcome fears and fall in love with the process, always earn a special place on the shelf. So it is with Cucina Rustica, the book that taught me that a recipe called Spaghetti with Oil and Garlic (the very first Dinner Tonight column I wrote) could be the most delicious thing in the world, and that most recipes would probably improve if you took out a few ingredients. This is a general lesson of Italian cooking that has informed the way I choose recipes. Yet while Cucina Rustica's recipes suggest simplicity, they are pitched perfectly between approachable and challenging. So I've never been bored cooking from it.
Tim Siadatan is the chef behind two of London's most popular Italian restaurants, Trullo and Padella. His first cookbook presents a British take on Italian cooking, marrying the best of the Italian cuisine together with British produce. Trullo is about enjoying every element of Italian cookery, whether than be putting on an impressive dinner party spread or simply mastering the perfect, silky pasta sauce.

The only cuisine that deserves to be called Italian cooking, writes Hazan by way of introduction to this celebrated 1992 title, is la cucina di casa: “there are no high or low roads in Italian cuisine. All roads lead to the home.” And it is how she then proceeds to unpick the fundamentals – to map out the way home, if you will – that sets the book apart. Starting with the triumvirate of Italian technique – battuto, soffritto and insaporire, which build flavour from the bottom up – she goes on to list the contents of the Italian pantry, before taking you through the various stages on a menu. Her chapter on soups, for example, opens with the idea that “A vegetable soup can tell you where you are in Italy, almost as precisely as a map.” Through eloquent prose and piercing insight, Hazan manages to unlock her country’s soul.

I'm going to have to go with the classic Silver Spoon book. Yes, it's got a lot of problems—the recipes are maddeningly under-detailed and under-tested. The instructions rely on vague timings instead of specific visual cues (how do I know my Coda Di Rospo Con Salsa D'Acciughe looks the way it's supposed to after baking for 30 minutes? What if my half lemon has less juice than yours?). There aren't a whole lot of pretty pictures, nice illustrations, or clear instructions on how to select ingredients, implement techniques, or any of the other details that make for a great, informative cookbook. What it does have, on the other hand, is a ludicrously comprehensive index (over 3,000 recipes) that spans throughout Italy. I'd never rely on it for a usable recipe, but as a database for ideas and as an encyclopedia on Italian dishes, it can't be beat."—J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, Chief Creative Officer
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