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If you’ve had toenail fungus for any length of time (weeks, months, years), is it recommended that you get rid of any closed-toe shoes that you’ve worn during this time? I’m hoping one or more of the remedies posted will work but am also concerned about whether my (extensive) collection of shoes may cause it to reappear. Since clippers and other tools should be disinfected/sterilized, it seems like the shoes could also be a problem. It would be quite expensive to replace my shoes.
What triggers candida in the first place? This overgrowth of yeast can develop from a number of factors, including antibiotic use, poor digestion, low immune system function, a high sugar and grain diet, stress or hormonal changes. All these create an acidic environment that encourages yeast growth and the presence of candida. Many people opt for over-the-counter anti-fungal creams or even medications, but they only treat the symptoms, not the environment that allows candida to flourish.
3. Lemon juice can be used to successfully treat toenail fungus. It to has antiseptic and anti fungal properties to eliminate the fungus. As mentioned in other treatments, it is not just important to kill the bacteria and fungus present on the toenail, but you will also want to stop it from spreading. Lemon juice can stop the fungus from spreading since it contains citric acid. First, apply fresh lemon juice onto the infected nail. Leave this on for about 30 minutes. After this time, rinse the lemon juice off thoroughly with warm water. You can use this treatment a couple of times a day until you obtain the positive results you are looking for. You can also try mixing equal parts lemon juice and olive oil, massaging the mixture onto the infected toe. Leave this on for a couple of hours and then rinse it off thoroughly. The olive oil will provide the added benefits of softening the skin and treating the nail, while the lemon juice controls the fungus. Again this can be done a couple of times a day.
Generally a nail fungal infection will start off as a white or yellow spot on the tip of the nail. As it begins to develop, the nail may become thickened, brittle/crumbly/ragged, change shape, become darker in color, or get dull. If the nail starts to separate from the nail bed, it is called onycholysis, which can be quite uncomfortable. Without treatment, toenail fungus can go on indefinitely. Even with treatment, it can occur on and off.
If you’ve had toenail fungus for any length of time (weeks, months, years), is it recommended that you get rid of any closed-toe shoes that you’ve worn during this time? I’m hoping one or more of the remedies posted will work but am also concerned about whether my (extensive) collection of shoes may cause it to reappear. Since clippers and other tools should be disinfected/sterilized, it seems like the shoes could also be a problem. It would be quite expensive to replace my shoes.

Hi, I have been treating my toenail fungus with distilled vinegar. It helped for a while but seems like it’s back. To avoid the hassle of gloves and soaks, I put some in a small spray bottle from the dollar store and sprayed my toenail twice a day. Then put the socks on. Now I think I will crush some salt and mix with coconut oil. And will use q-tip for applying to make things easier. Anyone tried mixing before?
I have a comment on the baking soda and acv remedy. You mentioned that baking soda is alkaline and helps to resist fungus growth an acv is acidic, which the funguses normal environment, but helps maintain the ph. However, I’ve read that fungus thrives in alkaline environments and the ph of acv is weaker acid and safe for skin, but the reason it works is because it will make it an uninviting environment for the fungus to live- and in turn, is killed off. Do you have any information that I am missing in this? It seems baking soda may not be the best. Thanks.
When I soaked my feet in the Listerine for 3o minutes to help with one of my toenails that might be a fungus the Listerine dried up on my feet and didn’t come off very easily. Had to scrub like crazy in the shower to get all the Listerine of my feet. Why was the Listerine dried to my skin and so difficult to get off and how can i prevent this from happening again?
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