I have a comment on the baking soda and acv remedy. You mentioned that baking soda is alkaline and helps to resist fungus growth an acv is acidic, which the funguses normal environment, but helps maintain the ph. However, I’ve read that fungus thrives in alkaline environments and the ph of acv is weaker acid and safe for skin, but the reason it works is because it will make it an uninviting environment for the fungus to live- and in turn, is killed off. Do you have any information that I am missing in this? It seems baking soda may not be the best. Thanks.


I cured a toenail in two weeks using a 50/50 mixture of borax and baking soda. Borax is a kind of salt… I mixed it together with a touch of water to make a paste (I mixed up a small container full all at once so I didn’t need to mix it every time I used it). I cut the infected nail back as far as I comfortably coud and cleaned in well with soap and water. Then I scrubbed the borax/baking soda mixture into the nail getting as much as I could under the nail. I wash it off then repeat but this time I leave it coating the toenail. I did this twice a day for two weeks and my infection is completely gone. I’ve tried every over the counter remedy, prescription strenth polish, teatree oil, etc. This really works well.
I can tell you my own mother struggled with toenail fungus on her big toe for over 10 years, and the reason why she originally got it and then continued to struggle with this fungus was the chemotherapy she went through when diagnosed with breast cancer years ago. After going through chemo, she had systemic yeast and candida issues and then developed the toenail fungus. The exact treatment I detail below is what we used with her to successfully erase her fungus.
Bear with me-I am about to get a little bit scientific here, but I find this to be an exciting way to combat fungus without using harsh chemicals. Medium chain fatty acids are almost miracles in how they work as natural fungicides. The fungal membrane is crucial to maintaining the “life” of the fungus, which is why many antifungal treatments target the fungal membrane. Fatty acids, such as the ones found abundantly in coconut oil, naturally insert themselves in the lipid (fat) layer of the fungal membrane and disturb it, leading eventually to cell disintegration and the ultimate destruction of the fungus (to put it in a nutshell.)
When I soaked my feet in the Listerine for 3o minutes to help with one of my toenails that might be a fungus the Listerine dried up on my feet and didn’t come off very easily. Had to scrub like crazy in the shower to get all the Listerine of my feet. Why was the Listerine dried to my skin and so difficult to get off and how can i prevent this from happening again?
Food intolerances — Some yeast infections are due to food allergies. Try to avoid foods that cause negative reactions of any kind and pay attention to symptoms you experience when eating things like dairy, eggs, certain nuts, wheat-containing foods and grains. If you think you have a food allergy or sensitivity, try an elimination diet to figure out what foods are causing intolerance and work on removing those foods.
Vicks Vapor Rub can do more than help you breathe easier when you have a cold – it can also eliminate nail fungus! The thymol, or oil of thyme, in Vicks Vapor Rub, has natural anti-fungal properties. Spreading it on affected areas can help disrupt the cell membranes of the fungus. While thyme oil has the same properties, Vicks is much easier to find in stores; in fact, you probably already have some in your medicine cabinet!
This pantry staple can help cure nail fungus and is also a wonderful home remedy for foot rot when applied topically or taken internally. Mix apple cider vinegar (do not use white vinegar) and Epsom salt with hot water and soak your feet in the solution twice a day for at least thirty minutes to help kill the nail fungus. Likewise, mix two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar with eight ounces of water – as well as a bit of honey for sweetness – and drink once a day.
Hi, I have been treating my toenail fungus with distilled vinegar. It helped for a while but seems like it’s back. To avoid the hassle of gloves and soaks, I put some in a small spray bottle from the dollar store and sprayed my toenail twice a day. Then put the socks on. Now I think I will crush some salt and mix with coconut oil. And will use q-tip for applying to make things easier. Anyone tried mixing before?

Nail fungus; be it on your toenails or your fingernails is an unpleasant business to have to deal with. Officially known as onychomcosis, it is most often caused by moisture trapped in a warm dark place (because of shoes, this is why it more commonly effects toenails) which is the environment fungus thrives in. In some cases it can be caused by mold, or yeast, but it’s still collectively called nail fungus-nail mold or nail yeast just doesn’t have quite the same ring to it.

My husband had the start of fungus on his big toe. It was getting thick and you could see the lines visibly in it. He kept putting Head and Shoulders shampoo on it when he washed his hair. It’s normal now after about three months of applying. He read that this shampoo has anti-fungal qualities (has zinc and pyrithione or ZPT) to rid hair of dandruff. I guess that applies to toes as well!
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