2. Apple cider vinegar also works well as a treatment. It is mildly acidic and can help prevent toenail fungus from spreading. It also has antibacterial properties, allowing it to kill fungus while restoring the skin’s pH levels. Remember, toenail fungus could be caused by abnormal pH levels of the skin. The vinegar is also beneficial since its mildly acidic nature not only kills bacteria and fungus, but also prevents it from spreading and causing further problems. Mix equal parts of apple cider vinegar with water. Then soak your toenail in the solution for about 30 minutes as a daily treatment. After this time, dry your toenail thoroughly. Continue this treatment for a few weeks or until the fungus is resolved.
My husband had the start of fungus on his big toe. It was getting thick and you could see the lines visibly in it. He kept putting Head and Shoulders shampoo on it when he washed his hair. It’s normal now after about three months of applying. He read that this shampoo has anti-fungal qualities (has zinc and pyrithione or ZPT) to rid hair of dandruff. I guess that applies to toes as well!
I had toe fungus for probably about three days and I was looking for someway to get rid of it! then I saw someone saying you can put bleach on it. so just today was sitting on the couch and was looking at my nail and I completely removed it with no pain at all. under it was like a black green color which was the fungus. then I remembered the comment I read about the bleach and how it kills the fungus. so I got a small bowl of bleach dipped a Cotten ball and put it just on the fungus and repeated several times. very quickly I did notice positive results. afterwards I thought just to be safe I should use nail clippers and cut off the dead fungus. (doing this also had no pain) there is a little bit o blood when you cut it off so have something to clean that up. so now I’m hoping when my nail grows back it will be heathy again! Hope this helps someone!!
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Baking soda is not fungicidal-that is, it does not kill the fungus. It is, however, fungistatic, which means it can prevent fungus from growing and spreading. The reason it acts like this is because it is alkaline-the opposite of acidic-and fungus is able to flourish when its environment is more acidic. It seems counter-intuitive then, that using vinegar to kill nail fungus would be a good idea, but vinegar is a fairly weak acid, and will help kill off the fungus without altering the Ph. of the environment in a harmful way.
Persistent fungal signs can show up slowly but last for years. Getting rid of toenail fungus can take some patience and requires time to fully heal. It can take several months until treatment is successful, but doing things the right way and getting rid of the underlying cause of nail fungus is the only thing that will keep the infection from coming back again.

Baking soda is not fungicidal-that is, it does not kill the fungus. It is, however, fungistatic, which means it can prevent fungus from growing and spreading. The reason it acts like this is because it is alkaline-the opposite of acidic-and fungus is able to flourish when its environment is more acidic. It seems counter-intuitive then, that using vinegar to kill nail fungus would be a good idea, but vinegar is a fairly weak acid, and will help kill off the fungus without altering the Ph. of the environment in a harmful way.
I have a comment on the baking soda and acv remedy. You mentioned that baking soda is alkaline and helps to resist fungus growth an acv is acidic, which the funguses normal environment, but helps maintain the ph. However, I’ve read that fungus thrives in alkaline environments and the ph of acv is weaker acid and safe for skin, but the reason it works is because it will make it an uninviting environment for the fungus to live- and in turn, is killed off. Do you have any information that I am missing in this? It seems baking soda may not be the best. Thanks.

Toenail fungus is an unsightly condition caused by yeast and other types of fungi. When a fungus infects the toenail, the result is yellowing and thickening of the nail. Eventually, the nail may begin to crumble, and the area beneath it may emit a foul smell. Doctors often prescribe oral medications for treating toenail fungus, but some people prefer home remedies, such as those that use bleach to kill the fungi.

Like athletes foot, you can work towards preventing enail fungus by keeping feet clean and, most importantly, dry. Don’t re-wear socks, and stick to open toed shoes if possible. It takes time and patience to get rid of toenail fungus, and for the nail to grow back healthy and normal again. Be diligent about applying your treatments (I can’t stress that enough, it’s really the key to getting these to work the best they can) and don’t overlook preventative methods to keep the fungus from coming back.


Medications prescribed for toenail fungus provide mixed results. And, they’re not without side effects. Your liver (as your body’s detox organ) takes the brunt of the chemicals found in all medications. If the liver is compromised in any way, medications add to the burden and can result in further damage or impaired function. Also, other significant health risks exist for those with autoimmune conditions.[1]
Check with your doctor if you have diabetes and may have nail fungus. Diabetes causes poor circulation in your feet, so you’re more susceptible to infections on your feet. Unfortunately, a simple nail fungus infection can develop into something worse if it’s left untreated. However, your doctor can examine your toenails and make a proper diagnosis so you can receive prompt treatment.[14]
First, mix 1 cup of your chosen vinegar with enough water to soak your feet in. Soak for 15 minutes, and then pat dry with paper towels. Follow this by adding several tablespoons of baking soda to enough water to soak your feet in, and soak for 15 minutes. Pat feet completely dry with paper towels. Do this twice a day. The idea is that the vinegar will kill off the fungus, while the baking soda will then inhibit the growth of more.
“They are effective in treating athlete’s foot and may help infected nails to some degree, but they are unlikely to clear fungal nail infections because those formulations do not effectively penetrate into the nail itself,” explains Dr. Zeichner. One such topical solution that does sink into the nail? A brush-on treatment called Jublia, an FDA-approved option you can ask your dermatologist about.
Thank for the information I’m sure going to try the one for toenail fungus,I recently developed the fungus after gallbladder suegery. also after many hours of research about stomach problems and what other issues are associated with stomach peoblems .and having the fungus is a sign of stomach problems,along with others stuff too. thank you for tip.
Hey, i’m fighting with this problem since i’m 12 years old, it makes me sick.. everytime I go to a public swimming pool or take a shower in my dance center I can be sure to get a new fungus! Now I found something that seems to support the cure, well of course I use the typical creme my doc prescribes, but i am now also using shoe inserts of cedar wood to support the curing process and i am well surprised! I have dry feet using them and seems like they have a natural antibacterial effect (i read a bit about it) so it’s a good thing i think! Hope i could help!
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