My girlfriend is 20 and her pinky toe nail is starting to look almost a bit deformed..? like the base of the nail has sunken in and i dont know what to do about it and we don’t really have the money to go and get any expensive ingredients or to the doctors.. :c I’m not sure what to do.. can anyone help? the nail is thick and kinda greenish ? it’s weird..
While they may not seem connected, the health of your digestive system can have an impact on the growth of nail fungus. Healthy gut bacteria can help prevent the growth of fungi and microbes in the body; an imbalance of flora in the digestive system can lead to fungal overgrowth. Maintaining gut health can help minimize the spread of nail fungus and keep it from returning in the future.
Hi, I have been treating my toenail fungus with distilled vinegar. It helped for a while but seems like it’s back. To avoid the hassle of gloves and soaks, I put some in a small spray bottle from the dollar store and sprayed my toenail twice a day. Then put the socks on. Now I think I will crush some salt and mix with coconut oil. And will use q-tip for applying to make things easier. Anyone tried mixing before?
Try using oil of oregano along with another essential oil called melaleuca, which is also known as tea tree oil. The uses of tea tree oil will astound you, including its ability to act as a natural antifungal agent. Use these two oils topically on your toenail fungus daily. I recommend three drops of oil of oregano and two drops of melaleuca applied directly on the toenail, four times a day, ideally.

Toenail fungus is a very common occurrence. Its symptoms include yellowing, inflammation and crumbling of the nail. It generally is not painful, but can be if the fungus spreads. If it is left untreated, it can lead to cracking and splitting of the nail, and even complete loss of the toenail. It usually occurs under conditions such as abnormal pH levels of the skin, diabetes, ongoing exposure to moist environments and a weakened immune system. Thankfully, there is good news when it comes to treating toenail fungus as there are numerous treatments that can cure and eliminate the fungus which is inexpensive. Here are some foods and treatments that can be used to treat these infections.
Thank for the information I’m sure going to try the one for toenail fungus,I recently developed the fungus after gallbladder suegery. also after many hours of research about stomach problems and what other issues are associated with stomach peoblems .and having the fungus is a sign of stomach problems,along with others stuff too. thank you for tip.
If you’ve had toenail fungus for any length of time (weeks, months, years), is it recommended that you get rid of any closed-toe shoes that you’ve worn during this time? I’m hoping one or more of the remedies posted will work but am also concerned about whether my (extensive) collection of shoes may cause it to reappear. Since clippers and other tools should be disinfected/sterilized, it seems like the shoes could also be a problem. It would be quite expensive to replace my shoes.
But the earlier you treat the nail infection, the more likely you are to cure it, explains, Joshua Zeichner, MD, a New York City–based board-certified dermatologist and director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center. “Treatment can take several months, even up to a year, as you need to wait for healthy nail to grow out, which is a slow process,” he says.
Food intolerances — Some yeast infections are due to food allergies. Try to avoid foods that cause negative reactions of any kind and pay attention to symptoms you experience when eating things like dairy, eggs, certain nuts, wheat-containing foods and grains. If you think you have a food allergy or sensitivity, try an elimination diet to figure out what foods are causing intolerance and work on removing those foods.
Medications prescribed for toenail fungus provide mixed results. And, they’re not without side effects. Your liver (as your body’s detox organ) takes the brunt of the chemicals found in all medications. If the liver is compromised in any way, medications add to the burden and can result in further damage or impaired function. Also, other significant health risks exist for those with autoimmune conditions.[1]
I have had a problem with itchy, scaly feet and thick fungus ridden toenails on one foot for years. I think a lot of the home treatments didn’t work because I wasn’t doing them every single day. So, here’s what I did: one day I would do a foot soak of half vinegar half water for 10ish minutes, the next day I would do a half peroxide half water soak for 10ish minutes (always erring on the side of more water for each soak). I alternated days for two weeks and then occasionally afterwards, like, maybe 2-3 times a month I’d do one soak with either the vinegar OR peroxide. Occasionally I use coconut oil when my feet are dry, so I’m sure that helps, but it’s not consistent.
But the earlier you treat the nail infection, the more likely you are to cure it, explains, Joshua Zeichner, MD, a New York City–based board-certified dermatologist and director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center. “Treatment can take several months, even up to a year, as you need to wait for healthy nail to grow out, which is a slow process,” he says.
Following this protocol for several months might be able to help solve the problem for good, and then you can slowly reintroduce sources of sugar like fruit, or whole grains, while monitoring your progress. However, keep in mind that some candida or yeast sufferers have lived with their condition for years, so combating the issue might take more than just a few weeks or months.
Cultured dairy or fermented foods (ideally organic and raw) — these are beneficial for replacing good bacteria in the gut since they provide probiotics. Probiotics help control yeast and also have numerous immune-enhancing effects. For other sources of probiotics, in addition to yogurt or kefir try cultured foods like kimchi, kombucha or sauerkraut.
With natural antiseptic and antifungal properties, castor oil and tea tree oil for nail fungus have been used for centuries. Undiluted tea tree oil can be applied directly to affected nails to help kill fungus; ten minutes after application, gently massage the oil into the nail using an old toothbrush. When applied to surrounding skin, tea tree oil is best diluted with a carrier oil such as coconut or olive oil. Continue to use daily until several weeks after new nail growth has occurred to prevent the fungus from returning.

I work with pools all spring/summer/fall every year (installing/removing/cleaning/maintaining), and am a plumber all year around, My feet are almost ALWAYS wet or in water daily, while I’ve been fortunate to have never had any fungal issue (yet), they got like how you described your feet, dry and cracked from constantly being wet and dry, What worked great for ME was to scrub my feet thoroughly with a good stiff foot scrubber brush and “Sloughing” creme (my wife got the brush and creme through her Avon makeup lady for less than $10) twice per day and than wash them off in very hot soapy water, than towel dried and powdered my feet with Johnson’s baby powder and heavily powdered my socks and shoes. That worked great for my very dry, cracked feet. they quickly became nice and smooth and soft again! No oils, meds or lotions helped. Now I just make sure that I wash, dry and powder my feet as soon as possible once they get wet or sweaty to keep them nice, and I also keep my shoes clean and dry. Good Luck!
Dermatophytes — fungus that grows on the skin, hair and nails but don’t penetrate tissues of the body. Athlete’s foot or Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte and can actually infect the toenails. Infection can also begin by touching objects that have dermatophytes on them, such as nail clippers, nail files, socks, shoes, shower floors, etc. Dermatophytes are the cause of most fungal toenail infections.

If you have diabetes, you may have reduced blood circulation and nerve supply in your feet. You're also at greater risk of a bacterial skin infection (cellulitis). So any relatively minor injury to your feet — including a nail fungal infection — can lead to a more serious complication. See your doctor if you have diabetes and think you're developing nail fungus.
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